Serving Western New York
since 1953

Hamburg - 716.648.5761
East Aurora - 716.655.3225
Niagara Falls - 716.298.8182


Council Opticians offers a full selection of the very latest in designer frames at everyday low prices.
We also have a full staff of Optometrists available to perform comprehensive eye examinations.

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Council Opticians

FAQs
How old should my child be for a first vision examination?
What is the difference between an optician, optometrist and ophthalmologist?
How can I tell if I have glaucoma?
Recently I started seeing dark spots and thread-like strands before my eyes. What causes this? Is it serious?
Can working with a video display terminal all day cause eye problems?
What is a cataract?

 


Q: How old should my child be for a first vision examination?
A: Examination is recommended by age four; sooner if you notice crossed-eyes or an apparent problem seeing clearly. Your optometrist will be able to check your child's ability to see clearly far away and up close; to change focus from far to near and back; and to use the two eyes together as a team. It is not necessary for your child to know the alphabet for these testing procedures. The optometrist can also detect any tendency toward such vision problems as nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism. Treatment to prevent or slow these problems may be started. In addition, this first examination is important in diagnosing a "lazy eye" early. Treatment for this is most effective when started early.

Q: What is the difference between an optician, optometrist and ophthalmologist?
A: Opticians, optometrists and ophthalmologists all provide eye care services. Optometrists and ophthalmologists examine eyes and prescribe vision-correcting lenses. Opticians manufacture and dispense corrective lenses. For the majority of individuals an optometrist is the doctor of choice for routine eye health and vision examinations.

OPTICIAN
An optician fits and fabricates eyewear from a prescription of an Optometrist or Ophthalmologist. The opticians' functions include prescription analysis; determination of the lens types best suited to the wearers needs and assistance in frame selection.

OPTOMETRIST
Doctors of Optometry are independent primary health care providers who specialize in the eye. Optometrists dispense ocular medications, prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses, and diagnose and treat diseases and disorders. They provide total eye health and vision care for all ages. An optometrist has completed four years of college premedical education and four years of graduate education, earning a Doctorate in Optometry. Optometrists are certified by a national board of examiners and licensed by New York State.

OPHTHALMOLOGIST
An ophthalmologist is a physician (M.D.) who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eye.

Q: How can I tell if I have glaucoma?
A: There usually are no symptoms. Early diagnosis and treatments are important to prevent permanent damage. Although there are various types of glaucoma, the most prevalent form is caused by a buildup of fluid in the eye. When our body makes too much of this fluid, or drainage is blocked, pressure builds inside the eye and can damage internal parts. By measuring your eye's pressure, examining your optic nerve during an internal eye health examination, and performing other tests, your optometrist can diagnose glaucoma signs far earlier than you can. Everyone over 35 or anyone with a family history of glaucoma should have these tests annually as part of a thorough eye examination. Glaucoma can usually be controlled with drug or surgical treatment, but vision destroyed by it cannot be restored.

Q: Recently I started seeing dark spots and thread-like strands before my eyes. What causes this? Is it serious?
A: You are seeing spots and floaters. They are usually harmless, but sometimes they signal a serious eye problem in need of prompt attention. These include such vision-threatening conditions as retinal detachment, other retinal disorders, cataracts, diabetes, high blood pressure or leukemia. You should, therefore, make an appointment with your optometrist for a thorough eye examination covering eye health as well as your vision. Be sure to mention the dark spots and strands you are seeing. More than likely you are seeing harmless particles of protein or other natural materials floating in the fluid inside your eyes, but you need a professional diagnosis. Even if your optometrist diagnoses the spots as harmless, have them re-evaluated annually or more often, if you notice a change.

Q: Can working with a video display terminal all day cause eye problems?
A: There is no conclusive evidence that video display terminal (VDT) work causes vision problems but it can aggravate existing ones, even minor ones that do not affect other seeing tasks, such as reading or driving. This is why the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that all VDT operators have periodic eye examinations. Tell your optometrist you are a VDT operator, describe your VDT work tasks, and mention any eye strain symptoms you are experiencing. Also, measure the working distance between your eyes and your VDT screen. All of this is important in determining your on-the-job vision needs. There are special aids for VDT operators, such as polarizing lenses to combat glare, and wide-band trifocals to give those who need an intermediate distance lens prescription a full view of the screen. Your optometrist can also advise about environmental factors and rest breaks for VDT workers.

Q: What is a cataract?
A: A cataract is cloudiness in the lens behind the pupil of your eye. Cataracts are usually caused by age and can be present at birth, inherited or caused by injury. Your optometrist can diagnose a cataract during a thorough eye examination. If it progresses, changes in your glasses may be necessary. Cataracts can blur your vision and if it interferes with your daily activities, it can be removed surgically. Good vision can usually be restored with a lens implant.

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